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In the News

2020 Writer-in-Residence Selected

PIGGOTT – Hugh Martin of Athens, Ohio, has been selected as the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum & Educational Center 2020 Writer-in-Residence. The residency will allow Martin to live and work in the community of Piggott for a month, sharing his knowledge and experience with local writers and working on his own writings.  A more detailed schedule of the residency will be available later.

The residency is made possible by an underwriting sponsorship by Piggott State Bank.

Martin is the author of In Country (BOA Editions, Ltd., 2018), The Stick Soldiers (BOA Editions, Ltd., 2013) and So, How Was the War? (Kent State UP, 2010). He joined the military three months prior to 9/11, served in Iraq in 2004, and returned home to graduate from Muskingum University in southern Ohio.

After completing his six-year enlistment, he spent time working in Ireland and visiting relatives in Poland, before returning to the U.S. to complete an master of fine arts degree at Arizona State University.

Martin is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Literature, a Pushcart Prize, a Yaddo Residency, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship, a Sewanee Writers’ Conference Fellowship, a Prague Summer Program Fellowship, and he was the inaugural winner of the Iowa Review Jeff Sharlet Award for Veterans. 

His essays and poetry have appeared in various places including PBS Newshour, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Grantland, The Sun and The Kenyon Review.  He was the 2014-15 Emerging Writer Lecturer at Gettysburg College and is currently a Ph.D. candidate at Ohio University.



Hemingway-Pfeiffer 2020 Writer-in-Residence Program Announced

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center in Piggott, Arkansas, is pleased to announce its 2020 writer-in-residence position.  The residency will be for the month of June 2020 and includes lodging at a beautiful loft apartment on the downtown square in Piggott over the City Market coffee shop.  The writer-in-residence will also have the opportunity to work in the studio where Ernest Hemingway worked on A Farewell to Arms during an extended stay with his wife’s family in 1928.  The residency includes a $1000 stipend to help cover food and transportation. The program is underwritten by sponsorship from Piggott State Bank.

The writer-in-residence will be expected to serve as mentor for a week-long retreat for writers at the educational center.  This retreat will be held June 8-12 and will be open to 12-14 writers from the region.  The recipient may be asked to hold one or two readings of his/her own work in the region.  The remainder of the month will be free to the writer-in-residence to work on his/her own work.

Candidates with an MA or MFA in a relevant field are preferred.  Please send a cover letter, CV, and writing sample to Dr. Adam Long at adamlong@astate.edu by Feb. 28, 2020.  Questions can also be directed to Dr. Long.  For more information about the museum or lodging (the Inn at Piggott), visit us at hemingway.astate.edu.

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center, an Arkansas State University Heritage Site, contributes to the understanding of the regional, national and global history of the 1920s and 1930s eras by focusing on the internationally connected Pfeiffer family of Piggott, Arkansas, and their son-in-law and regular guest Ernest Hemingway. This includes drawing on Hemingway’s influence as a noted American author to foster interest in literature and the arts and promote excellence in both.



Berry Wins Short Fiction Contest

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum has announced the winner of its 6th Annual Short Fiction Contest.  Alan Berry of North Arkansas College was selected as winner for his story “Brother, Sister.” Of the story, the judge said, “In Alan Berry’s “Brother, Sister”, a young boy supports his mother after his father commits a crime and absconds. Through an artfully spare style, Berry communicates much more than he says about the impoverished and tense relationships in this family unit, and the weathering away of parental strength. ‘Brother, Sister’ is a powerful series of vignettes, and the psychic abilities of Brother add a delightful strangeness to a familiar domestic scene. A gorgeous, skillful fiction.”

Berry is a retired industrial supervisor who has returned to college after a forty-seven-year absence.  He attends North Arkansas College in Harrison, Arkansas.  A native of Louisville, Kentucky, he has made his home in Arkansas for more than three decades.  Berry mixes attending school with writing, woodworking, fishing, sailing, and teaching martial arts.



Dorene O’Brien Announced as 2019 Writer-in-Residence

Dorene O’Brien
2019 Writer-in-Residence

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum & Educational Center announced its 2019 Writer-in-Residence this week.  Dorene O’Brien of Detroit, Michigan, will spend the month of June in residence at the museum and will serve as a mentor for other writers at the museum’s June Writers’ Retreat.  The residency is made possible by an underwriting sponsorship by Piggott State Bank.

Dorene O’Brien is a Detroit-based creative writing teacher and writer whose stories have won the Red Rock Review Mark Twain Award for Short Fiction, the Chicago Tribune Nelson Algren Award, the New Millennium Writings Fiction Prize, and the international Bridport Prize. She is also an NEA and a Vermont Studio Center creative writing fellow. Her work has been nominated for three Pushcart prizes, has been published in special Kindle editions, and has appeared in the Baltimore Review, Madison Review, Best of Carve MagazineShort Story ReviewSouthern Humanities ReviewDetroit Noir, Montreal ReviewPassages North, and others. Voices of the Lost and Found, her first fiction collection, was a finalist for the Drake Emerging Writer Award and won the USA Best Book Award for Short Fiction. Her fiction chapbook, Ovenbirds and Other Stories, won the Wordrunner Chapbook Prize in 2018. Her second full-length collection, What It Might Feel Like to Hope, released in 2019, was named first runner-up in the Mary Roberts Rinehart Fiction Prize and won a gold medal in the Independent Publishers Book Awards (IPPY). She is currently writing a literary/Sci-Fi hybrid novel.

In addition to serving as a mentor for the June retreat, O’Brien will spend the month working on her own writing in the Barn-Studio where Ernest Hemingway penned portions of A Farewell to Arms.  She will also live in the community, in a loft apartment on the Piggott Square which is a part of the Inn at Piggott.

“We hope that writers will take this opportunity to work with Dorene,” said museum director Adam Long.  “Besides being a great writer herself, she is also an experienced mentor to other writers.  The selection committee and I feel that she is a great fit for our retreat program.”



Sixth Annual Short Fiction Contest Announced

Kate Osana Simonian

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center will sponsor its Sixth Annual Short Story Contest.  This is a state-wide competition open to all undergraduate students currently enrolled in an Arkansas college or university, regardless of major.  The only stipulations are that the submitted material must be an unpublished fictional short story on any subject matter no more than 5000 words in length.  All submissions are due to the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum no later than April 5, 2019.  Winners will be notified by May 3.  They will receive a free spot in this June’s Writers’ Retreat and will be invited to give a public reading at the museum.

This year’s contest will be judged by Kate Osana Simonian.  Kate is an Armenian-Australian novelist, essayist, and short story writer. She hails from Sydney, but is completing her English PhD at Texas Tech, where she is a Presidential Fellow. Her work has been published by, or is forthcoming in, The Iowa Review, The Michigan Quarterly, Ninth Letter, Shenandoah, The Chicago Tribune, and The Best Australian Stories. In 2017, she won the Nelson Algren Award, and her honors include a Tenneessee Williams scholarship to the Sewanee Writer’s Conference, and a position as the inaugural Writer-in-Residence at the Hemingway-Pfeiffer museum in Arkansas. Kate is an assistant editor for Iron Horse and fiction editor for Vanguard: Graduate Creative Exercises for the Classroom (TTU Press 2019). Ask about her novel-in-stories, Australialand, or check her out at katesimonian.com

Past winners of the contest include Anushah Jiwani of Hendrix College, Mike Smith of Lyon College, Justin Lee Hunsperger of the University of Central Arkansas, Emily Hill of Hendrix College, and Rebecca Prather of Arkansas State University.



Applications for 2019 Writer-in-Residence Now Being Accepted

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center in Piggott, Arkansas, is pleased to announce its 2019 writer-in-residence position.  The residency will be for the month of June 2019 and includes lodging at a beautiful loft apartment on the downtown square in Piggott over the City Market coffee shop.  The writer-in-residence will also have the opportunity to work in the studio where Ernest Hemingway worked on A Farewell to Arms during an extended stay with his wife’s family in 1928.  The residency includes a $1000 stipend to help cover food and transportation.

The writer-in-residence will be expected to serve as mentor for a week-long retreat for writers at the educational center.  This retreat will be held June 10-14 and will be open to 12-14 writers from the region.  The recipient will be expected to hold one or two readings of his/her own work in the region.  The remainder of the month will be free to the writer-in-residence to work on his/her own work.

Candidates with an MA or MFA in a relevant field are preferred.  Please send a cover letter, CV, and writing sample to Dr. Adam Long at adamlong@astate.edu by Feb. 28, 2019.  Questions can also be directed to Dr. Long.

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center, an Arkansas State University Heritage Site, contributes to the understanding of the regional, national and global history of the 1920s and 1930s eras by focusing on the internationally connected Pfeiffer family of Piggott, Arkansas, and their son-in-law and regular guest Ernest Hemingway. This includes drawing on Hemingway’s influence as a noted American author to foster interest in literature and the arts and promote excellence in both.



Short Fiction Contest Winner Announced

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum has announced the winner of its 5th Annual Short Fiction Contest. Rebecca Prather of Arkansas State University was selected as winner for her story “Mr. Cameron’s Urn.” Of the story, the judge said, “This writer has created characters with complexly developed emotions. Both the son tentatively grieving for his abusive father and the friend trying to comfort him are realized with skill.”

Prather is a junior at Arkansas State University majoring in English. She is from Marked Tree and transferred to A-State after spending her freshman year at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York. This is her first short fiction contest. Prather was selected from a field of submissions from undergraduate students at public and private institutions in the state of Arkansas.



Kate Osana Simonian Announced as Writer-in-Residence

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum & Educational Center announced its inaugural Writer-in-Residence this week.  Kate Simonian of Texas Tech University will spend the month of June in residence at the museum and will serve as a mentor for other writers at the museum’s June Writers’ Retreat.  The residency is made possible by an underwriting sponsorship by Piggott State Bank.

Kate Osana Simonian is an Armenian-Australian essayist, short story writer, and novelist hailing from Sydney. She is on a Presidential Fellowship at Texas Tech, where she is completing a Creative Writing PhD. She holds an MFA in Fiction from Brooklyn College (CUNY) and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Technology Sydney.  Her work has been published by, or is forthcoming in, Kenyon Review Online, Colorado Review, Ninth Letter, Passages North, Post Road, The Chicago Tribune, and Best Australian Stories. She has won various honors, including the Nelson Algren Award, a Truman Capote Fellowship, and a Tennessee Williams Scholarship to Sewanee Writer’s Conference. Along with acting as an associate editor for Iron Horse, she is the fiction editor for Opossum: A Literary Marsupial, a journal on the intersection of literature and music.

In addition to serving as a mentor for the June retreat, Simonian will spend the month working on her own writing in the Barn-Studio where Ernest Hemingway penned portions of A Farewell to Arms.  She will also live in the community, in a loft apartment on the Piggott Square which is a part of the Inn at Piggott.

“We are thrilled to have Kate with us this summer,” said museum director Adam Long.  “The selection committee and I felt that she is a great fit for our community, and we can’t wait to work with her.”



2018 Writer-in-Residence Program Announced

We are pleased to announce our inaugural writer-in-residence position. The residency will be for the month of June 2018 and includes lodging at a beautiful loft apartment on the downtown square in Piggott over the City Market coffee shop. The writer-in-residence will also have the opportunity to work in the studio where Ernest Hemingway worked on A Farewell to Arms during an extended stay with his wife’s family in 1928. The residency includes a $1000 stipend to help cover food and transportation.  Piggott State Bank is the underwriting sponsor of the residency.

The writer-in-residence will be expected to serve as mentor for a week-long retreat for writers at the educational center. This retreat will be held June 4-8 and will be open to 12-14 writers from the region. The recipient will be expected to hold one or two readings of his/her own work in the region. The remainder of the month will be free to the writer-in-residence to work on his/her own work.

Candidates with an MA or MFA in a relevant field are preferred. Please send a cover letter, CV, and writing sample to Dr. Adam Long at adamlong@astate.edu by Feb. 28, 2018. Questions can also be directed to Dr. Long.

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center, an Arkansas State University Heritage Site, contributes to the understanding of the regional, national and global history of the 1920s and 1930s eras by focusing on the internationally connected Pfeiffer family of Piggott, Arkansas, and their son-in-law and regular guest Ernest Hemingway. This includes drawing on Hemingway’s influence as a noted American author to foster interest in literature and the arts and promote excellence in both.



HPMEC Holds Retreat for Military Veterans

Nine talented writers recently came together to hone their skills and form a bond at the annual writing retreat for military veterans. The event took place at the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center (HPMEC) at the site where author Ernest Hemingway penned much of his iconic war novel, A Farewell to Arms.

This weekend retreat was funded through a partnership with the Arkansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Dr. Rob Lamm, professor of English at Arkansas State University, served as mentor for the retreat. Lamm, a mentor at other retreats at HPMEC, said, “This retreat is the highlight of my year. I get to work with talented writers of all sorts as they write about their experiences in the service.

“There was a nurse who wrote a beautiful eulogy for her grandmother. There was a man who wrote a deep and complex poem about his most recent divorce. There was a pilot who helped develop the dog-fight training program. There was a chaplain who in his own way helped to save lives. I felt a new comfort about our country.”

Lamm continued, “The best part was getting to know them personally. They continue to offer their wisdom and continue to serve through their writings.”

Writers began each day with exercises to get them started, often looking at samples of Hemingway’s writing as models for their own. They enjoyed lunch together at the Educational Center and ended the afternoon with a group meeting to reflect, share and discuss the processes used by each writer.

Between formal meetings, the writers had time to work individually, often in the same rooms where Hemingway wrote. The format allowed writers time to focus on their own creative interests, to receive feedback on their work, and to form relationships with other writers.