And this number is buy lipitor online improving swiftly however, if buy furosemide online you train yourself to buy nexium consider the procedure as buy cytotec online a fat burning strategy, buy doxycycline as opposed to a diet, you.

In the News

2018 Writer-in-Residence Program Announced

We are pleased to announce our inaugural writer-in-residence position. The residency will be for the month of June 2018 and includes lodging at a beautiful loft apartment on the downtown square in Piggott over the City Market coffee shop. The writer-in-residence will also have the opportunity to work in the studio where Ernest Hemingway worked on A Farewell to Arms during an extended stay with his wife’s family in 1928. The residency includes a $1000 stipend to help cover food and transportation.

The writer-in-residence will be expected to serve as mentor for a week-long retreat for writers at the educational center. This retreat will be held June 4-8 and will be open to 12-14 writers from the region. The recipient will be expected to hold one or two readings of his/her own work in the region. The remainder of the month will be free to the writer-in-residence to work on his/her own work.

Candidates with an MA or MFA in a relevant field are preferred. Please send a cover letter, CV, and writing sample to Dr. Adam Long at adamlong@astate.edu by Feb. 28, 2018. Questions can also be directed to Dr. Long.

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center, an Arkansas State University Heritage Site, contributes to the understanding of the regional, national and global history of the 1920s and 1930s eras by focusing on the internationally connected Pfeiffer family of Piggott, Arkansas, and their son-in-law and regular guest Ernest Hemingway. This includes drawing on Hemingway’s influence as a noted American author to foster interest in literature and the arts and promote excellence in both.



HPMEC Holds Retreat for Military Veterans

Nine talented writers recently came together to hone their skills and form a bond at the annual writing retreat for military veterans. The event took place at the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center (HPMEC) at the site where author Ernest Hemingway penned much of his iconic war novel, A Farewell to Arms.

This weekend retreat was funded through a partnership with the Arkansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Dr. Rob Lamm, professor of English at Arkansas State University, served as mentor for the retreat. Lamm, a mentor at other retreats at HPMEC, said, “This retreat is the highlight of my year. I get to work with talented writers of all sorts as they write about their experiences in the service.

“There was a nurse who wrote a beautiful eulogy for her grandmother. There was a man who wrote a deep and complex poem about his most recent divorce. There was a pilot who helped develop the dog-fight training program. There was a chaplain who in his own way helped to save lives. I felt a new comfort about our country.”

Lamm continued, “The best part was getting to know them personally. They continue to offer their wisdom and continue to serve through their writings.”

Writers began each day with exercises to get them started, often looking at samples of Hemingway’s writing as models for their own. They enjoyed lunch together at the Educational Center and ended the afternoon with a group meeting to reflect, share and discuss the processes used by each writer.

Between formal meetings, the writers had time to work individually, often in the same rooms where Hemingway wrote. The format allowed writers time to focus on their own creative interests, to receive feedback on their work, and to form relationships with other writers.



Anushah Jiwani Wins 4th Annual Short Fiction Contest

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum has announced the winner of its 4th Annual Short Fiction Contest. Anushah Jiwani of Hendrix College was selected as winner for her story “Broken Tasbihs.” Of the story, the judge said, “This writer knows not only how to bring characters and places alive through the careful and articulate use of imagery, but she also delivers the story in compelling language and with fine attention to important technical matters like sentence structure and variety. Also important, of course, is the story’s subject: identity and the struggle to both understand and come to terms with being a person of more than one culture. ‘Broken Tasbihs’ is absorbing throughout and bespeaks a writer deserving of the prize.”  Anushah was selected from a field of submissions from undergraduate students at public and private institutions in the state of Arkansas.

Anushah is a senior at Hendrix College in Conway double-majoring in English-Creative Writing and International Relations. She was an editorial intern for the Readers’ Map of Arkansas project and for the Oxford American magazine, and last summer she served as a communications intern for PEN America in New York.  She recently took honors in the Southern Literary Festival Competition and won 3rd place in the statewide Jeannie Dolan Carter 2017 Collegiate Poetry Contest sponsored by the Poets’ Roundtable of Arkansas. Much of Anushah’s writing centers on the duality of her Pakistani-American identity.

This year’s contest was judged by Andrea Hollander, the author of four full-length poetry collections: Landscape with Female Figure: New & Selected Poems, a finalist for the Oregon Book Award; Woman in the Painting; The Other Life; and House Without a Dreamer, which won the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize. Other honors include an Oregon Literary Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and prose memoir), the D. H. Lawrence Fellowship, the Runes Poetry Prize, two poetry fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and two from the Arkansas Arts Council. Her poems and essays have appeared in numerous anthologies, college textbooks, and literary journals. For twenty-two years she served as the Writer-in-Residence at Lyon College, where she was awarded the Lamar Williamson Prize for Excellence in Teaching. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she teaches workshops at the Attic Institute and Mountain Writers Series.



Papa’s Upland Bird Hunt and Dinner

On Saturday, March 4, the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum hosted Papa’s Upland Bird Hunt and Dinner at Liberty Hill Outfitters in Rector. The hunt celebrated Ernest Hemingway’s hunting legacy in Northeast Arkansas.

Ernest Hemingway was a regular visitor of his in-laws, the Pfieffer family of Piggott, Arkansas. One of his favorite pastimes during his visits was quail hunting on Crowley’s Ridge. On March 4, twenty hunters from around the country came to Crowley’s Ridge to hunt and share a quail dinner. The hunt, a Continental style pheasant hunt, was hosted by Liberty Hill Outfitters. Chow at One Eighteen prepared the quail dinner.

Museum Director Adam Long said that this hunt is expected to become an annual event. He said, “This was our first charity hunt, and we had a great time. We expect to host another hunt next year.” He continued, “The folks at Liberty Hill and Chow did a great job in making the event a success. We are also very thankful to our sponsors for their help.”

This event was sponsored by First National Bank-Piggott, Glaub Farm Management, LLC, State Representative Joe Jett (paid for by State Representative Joe Jett), Olympus Construction, Inc., and Piggott State Bank.

To receive information about future hunts, please contact us.



Riddle Takes First Place in Student Art Exhibition

Winners of the 15th Annual Hemingway-Pfeiffer Student Art Exhibition were announced February 4 at a reception at the Piggott City Market. The annual juried art competition invites students within a 50-mile radius of Piggott to submit art for exhibition at the museum.  This year, works were submitted by eleven school districts in Northeast Arkansas and Southeast Missouri.  Prizes for the competition were provided by the Matilda and Karl Pfeiffer Museum and Study Center of Piggott.

Student art was exhibited at Piggott City Market from January 31-February 3, with a reception for artists and awards ceremony on February 4. This year’s winner was Blue Man Staring by Caleb Riddle, a senior at Piggott High School. Second place was Preparation by Bianca Thomas of Puxico High School.  Third place was Radical Bruh by Jessie Martin of Bay High School.  A number of honorable mentions were also awarded.



4th Annual Hemingway-Pfeiffer Short Story Contest

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center will sponsor its Fourth Annual Short Story Contest. This is a state-wide competition open to all undergraduate students currently enrolled in an Arkansas college or university, regardless of major. The only stipulations are that the submitted material must be an unpublished fictional short story on any subject matter no more than 2500 words in length. All submissions are due to the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum no later than April 3, 2017. Winners will be notified by May 1. They will receive a free spot in this June’s Writers’ Retreat and will be invited to give a public reading at the museum.

This year’s contest will be judged by Andrea Hollander, the author of four full-length poetry collections: Landscape with Female Figure: New & Selected Poems, a finalist for the Oregon Book Award; Woman in the Painting; The Other Life; and House Without a Dreamer, which won the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize. Other honors include an Oregon Literary Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes (in poetry and prose memoir), the D. H. Lawrence Fellowship, the Runes Poetry Prize, two poetry fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and two from the Arkansas Arts Council. Her poems and essays have appeared in numerous anthologies, college textbooks, and literary journals. For twenty-two years she served as the Writer-in-Residence at Lyon College, where she was awarded the Lamar Williamson Prize for Excellence in Teaching. She lives in Portland, Oregon, where she teaches workshops at the Attic Institute and Mountain Writers Series.

Students interested in the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Short Story Contest should contact the museum.



2017 Cuba Trip Announced

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum & Educational Center is taking a very unique trip to Cuba in May 2017. This Friends of the Pfeiffers trip will follow Hemingway’s footsteps from his novel Islands in the Stream. This small, guided trip is open to the public and will visit the beautiful and virgin cayos (keys) along pristine central coast, along with sites associated with Hemingway’s time in Cuba and other traditional sites in Havana.

Ernest Hemingway lived in Cuba for 21 years. He wrote The Old Man and the Sea (for which he won the Pulitzer Prize) at the home he called Finca Vigía or “lookout farm,” which is located nine miles outside of Havana.

This 8-day/7-night trip will have two exciting parts. First, we will travel to Havana to enjoy the art, music, dance and architecture of the city. Travelers will enjoy a private reception with the Curator of Finca Vigía, explore Old Havana (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), and see the amazing architecture in Central Havana. We will stop at many of Hemingway’s favorite places: Hotel Ambos Mundos, La Bodeguita del Medio, El Floridita, and Sloppy Joe’s. In addition to sites specifically associated with Hemingway, travelers will also get to enjoy some of the Cuban classics: a visit to the Rum Museum, a ride in a classic American car, and a visit to a cigar factory. Part two will be an amazing exploration of the keys off the central coast, Cayo Coco and Cayo Guillermo, which provided the backdrop for Hemingway’s Islands in the Stream. Guests will have an opportunity to interact with the locals for optional activities including fishing, diving, snorkeling, hiking, bird watching, or just exchanging ideas with other Hemingway lovers.

This is the museum’s second trip to Cuba. Thirty-four travelers from ten states joined the museum for a trip in 2014. To register for the trip, or to get pricing or other information, contact the museum.



Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum Holds Retreat for Veterans

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum & Educational Center recently held a Writing Retreat for Military Veterans. This weekend retreat was funded through a partnership with the Arkansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Over the course of the weekend, nine talented writers came together to hone their skills and to form a community in Northeast Arkansas at the site where Ernest Hemingway penned much of his iconic war novel A Farewell to Arms.

Dr. Rob Lamm of Arkansas State University served as mentor for the retreat. Lamm, a mentor at other retreats at HPMEC, said, “These are very special people–veterans from many branches of service who share a love of literature. Ernest Hemingway would have been impressed by their writing talents. Even more, he would admire their courage as some chose to revisit the drama and trauma of their experiences by writing memoirs, fiction, and poetry.” Lamm continued, “Courage was the unstated yet ever-present theme of the Retreat. Some writers recalled battles that we associate with war. Others wrote of battles for social acceptance and struggles with personal demons.”

Writers began each day with exercises to get them started, often looking at samples of Hemingway’s writing as models for their own. They enjoyed lunch together at the Educational Center and ended the afternoon with a group meeting to reflect, share, and discuss the processes used by each writer. Between formal meetings, the writers had time to work individually, often in the same rooms where Hemingway wrote. The format allowed writers time to focus on their own creative interests, to receive feedback on their work, and to form relationships with other writers.

Writers’ Retreats for general audiences are held twice annually at the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum in Piggott. The next retreat is scheduled for Nov. 7-11, 2016, with Andrea Hollander of Portland, OR, serving as mentor. Click here for more information.



Smith Wins Third Annual Short Story Contest

Photo Courtesy of Dixie Knight Photography

Jo McDougall.  Photo Courtesy of Dixie Knight Photography

The Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum has announced the winners of its 3rd Annual Short Fiction contest. Mike Smith of Lyon College won first place for his story “Courage,” which the judge said, “has compelling characters and dialog, and it kept me interested all through the story. The author tells a story vividly and with a sure control.” Smith was selected from a field of submissions from undergraduate students at public and private institutions in the state of Arkansas.

Justin Duyao of Harding University won second place. The judge said his story, “SportsCenter and Cigarettes,” “is a story well told about love and change and disappointment, and it is paced well. Its ending surprised me.” Austin Ellis of John Brown University won third place for his story “Most Wonderful Things” The judge says: “The setting is compelling and mysterious, and the characters, children dealing with their parents’ conflict, are believable. The imagery, especially in the ending line, is powerful.”

The contest was judged by Jo McDougall. She is the author of a memoir, Daddy’s Money: a Memoir of Farm and Family, University of Arkansas Press, and seven books of poetry, including her most recent, In the Home of the Famous Dead: Collected Poems, University of Arkansas Press (2015), and The Undiscovered Room, Tavern Books (2016). She has taught fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry at various universities in the South and the Midwest and has directed the fiction, non-fiction, and poetry writing workshops at the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Educational Center.  She has also conducted prose and poetry workshops at the Writers Place, Kansas City, Missouri; the Chautauqua Institute; Round Top Writing Festival, and others. She is the author of numerous essays and book reviews published in Midwest Quarterly and Georgia Review. She is the winner of awards from, among others, the DeWitt Wallace Readers Digest Foundation, the Academy of American Poets, and the Porter Prize Fund, as well as fellowships from the MacDowell Colony. McDougall’s work has appeared in such journals as Georgia Review, Hudson Review, Kenyon Review, Toad Suck Review, and New Letters. She has been inducted into the Arkansas Writers Hall of Fame. A graduate of the MFA in Creative Writing program at the University of Arkansas, McDougall was co-director of the creative writing program at Pittsburg State University, where she also directed the Distinguished Visiting Writing Series. She lives in Little Rock.



Hemingway-Pfeiffer Art Exhibition Winner Announced

IMG_1540PIGGOTT – Winners of the 14th Annual Hemingway-Pfeiffer Student Art Exhibition were announced January 30 at a reception at the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum in Piggott.  The annual juried art competition invites students within a 50-mile radius of Piggott to submit art for exhibition at the museum.  This year, works were submitted by eight school districts in Northeast Arkansas and Southeast Missouri.  Prizes for the competition were provided by the Matilda and Karl Pfeiffer Museum and Study Center of Piggott.

Student art was exhibited on the campus of ASU-Jonesboro from January 11-22. The exhibition was then on display at the museum’s Educational Center in Piggott from January 26-29, with a reception for artists and awards ceremony on January 30.  This year’s winner was See No Evil by Anna Oppenheim, a freshman at Bay High School.